“ENDLESSLY WICKED, ENDLESSLY TRUE”: TALKING BOOKS WITH WRITER MOLLY YOUNG

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Ever since I was little, I’ve had a love affair with reading. A big part of why I’ve wanted to be a writer since I was six years old was because I loved reading and books so much. And as someone who is still trying to find her voice, reading a variety of things is important to me. But finding new things to read can get overwhelming. A lot of the places I get my recommendations come from people with very similar tastes, and so most of the books I read are pretty similar. That’s where Read Like the Wind comes in.

Read Like the Wind is a monthly newsletter created by one of my favourite writers, Molly Young. Each month features three books, as well as a few other recommendations. What I like most about Molly’s recommendations is that they are never books that I have heard of before. They cover a range of interests and curiosities, and encourage me to explore topics that I would have never pursued otherwise. Curiosity is a characteristic I value, and it seems to play a key role in all the projects that Molly undertakes.

I’ve read and admired Molly’s writing for a long time, and the delivery of her newsletter has only increased my admiration. Recently, I nervously emailed Molly to ask if she’d be down to answer a few questions about Read Like the Wind and her relationship with books. She immediately accepted and after freaking out for an entire day, I sent her a few questions. Read what she had to say below 🌻

What made you want to start sending out your newsletter? Why not share your Goodreads account or start an Instagram account?
I love the intimacy of email. Because it comes from my address, it means that people often respond with their own opinions or recommendations for me, which I love. Plus, it allows readers to access the newsletter on their own time. If they don’t feel like reading it when it appears, no prob— they can archive it in their inbox for the next time they need a book rec.

The best thing about your newsletter is that the books you recommend are typically titles I don’t see recommended elsewhere. Where do you find your recommendations? What makes a book worth recommending?

If you think about it, book recs are the original memes. We’ve all had that experience of reading a book, freaking out over how good it is, and recommending it to a friend…who recommends it to another friend…and on it goes. Like “going viral” but in very slow motion. I only recommend books that made me freak out on some level, which is why the newsletter comes out infrequently!

I once read that you read about three hours a day. Do you do it in just one block? Or little by little? Do you ever have days where reading feels like a challenge?

I treat myself to bursts of reading throughout the day. Of course, there are days when I don’t pick up a book once. Since I’m a writer, I’m lucky enough to set my own schedule, which means I’ll often work for an hour, then read for 30 minutes, then work for an hour, and so on. The reading periods offer a break for my brain but also a kick in the ass because they remind me of what good writing looks like.

How have books and reading impacted your life? What book (s) would you say have defined your life so far?

Books like Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie and Reef by Romesh Gunesekera come to mind. They are page-turning heart-shredding books that utterly smashed my (inevitably limited) experience of the world.

MOLLY’S MUMBLING CAP RECS

THE VACATION READ

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My personal metric for a vacation read is that it's easy enough to be intermittent—you can pick it up or let it be without losing steam—but brain-gripping enough to provide a steady opportunity for escapism. My Sister the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite fits the bill. It’s about an Instagram hottie who goes on murder sprees. Braithwaite is the voice of a generation that I want to be a part of.

THE CHALLENGER

The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton. Endlessly wicked, endlessly true.

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THE RE-READ

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin